General Meeting


Data Journalism In Canada: Why we're so far behind (and what we can do to change that)

Data Journalism is a rapidly growing global discipline. It involves using data as a foundation and tool while also being a researcher and above all, an effective story teller. Complex social and business problems can be discussed and solved in this way. These skills and tools can be used by data journalists and other professionals in their day-to-day roles. In the role of a data journalist, I spend my days sitting in front of spreadsheets, scrapers, and making Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) requests for more data. That's because I realize the power that in data, if you know where to look. I am part of a small (but growing) number of data journalists in Canada. And while we've definitely fallen behind other countries' newsrooms (particularly in the US and UK), we're not out of the running yet. Here's what needs to be done. Here's what we can accomplish. And here's you can do to help.

Speaker

David Weisz is a freelance journalist. He is passionate about researching, open data, and enterprise investigations. David graduated with a Bachelor of Journalism from Carleton University in 2009, where he specialized in print, online and investigative reporting.Over the past year, David's interest in computer-assisted reporting (which was a component of his investigative specialization) has become a full-time obsession. David, who is 25 years old, brings the perspective of a youthful, energetic new generation of journalists who are not afraid to mine big data for potential stories. Davidís direct, hands-on experience with modern data tools and techniques provide insight into the rapidly growing field of data journalism.This past summer David completed an editorial internship at The Grid, an awardwinning weekly Toronto publication. During this time, he took a week off to attend University of King's College Data Journalism Bootcamp run by veteran data journalist Fred Vallance-Jones. David currently contributes software reviews for Duke University's Reporters' Lab.

References


Meeting: Wednesday, November 21, 2012

8:30 a.m. Registration; 9:00 a.m. Start; Expected finish 11:00

No advance reservations are required to attend this presentation. Should you wish to attend using the Web then, please register using the link below, before 5 pm on the previous day.

Location: , 91 King Street East (King/Yonge subway ), Toronto.

Membership: Attendance is free for IRMAC members. A guest fee of $30 applies to non-members. For your convenience, guest fees can now be made, in advance, online using credit cards.

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